Interview about favourite song

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domino
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Interview about favourite song

#1 Post by domino »

There is a series of artists who where asked about their favourite song in the latest issue of the german magazine "Süddeutsche Zeitung Magazin".

The boys open this series with – suprise suprise – Passion by The Flirts. I don't know if it's an interview that was already published anywhere.
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telys
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Re: Interview about favourite song

#2 Post by telys »

A good interview. Chris tells the story of how he heard Passion for the first time, asked a DJ about the name of the song, got it written down on a piece of paper, bought the 12'' for 5 pounds and listened to it with Neil (who tells the old story of the bin at Smash hits with all the dance records). The became obsessed. Chris finds a punk undertone to the Bobby O sound. Lot's more in the interview, this is just a brief recollection.
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jasonjohn
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Re: Interview about favourite song

#3 Post by jasonjohn »

any chance of an english translation?

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leesmapman
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Re: Interview about favourite song

#4 Post by leesmapman »

Loosely translated:

NT: "The most important song of our lives? That must be Passion from The Flirts". You heard it first, Chris. So you have to tell about it. We're of course talking about the 12" version.
CL: Ah, that was a long time ago.
NT: It must have been 1982
CL: Are we that old?
NT: Chris is one of those people who walks up to a DJ to ask what record is playing. He still does that. I remember you came back from the DJ with a note, and on that note it said: Passion from The Flirts.
CL: That was the time that almost all songs you heard in London came from the same producer: Bobby Orlando, alias Bobby O from New York. In the shops of Carnaby Street, at Leicester Square, everywhere were the songs of Bobby O. And one of these songs was Passion. I still know where and how I bought the 12" vinyl. It cost 5 pounds, which...
NT: ... was scandalously expensive!
CL: I actually didn't have any penny. But what a brilliant production! Those crystal clear sounds, pure electronic, and then those vocals that start after 4 and a half minutes! That 12" version lasted forever!
NT (singing): "I'm waiting for you baby, it's time to show and tell"
CL: From that moment, we were obsessed with Bobby O.
NL: At that time I worked at Smash Hits. At the editorial staff, we had a box with records which we called the "dumper". Back then, music journalists got an incredible amount of free records and most of these records ended up in the dumper rightaway. It occured to me that most of these were dance-records - read: music that has no value for the rock-critics at the staff. I used to say longer at the office, when everyone was gone from the office, to go through all these records. They all were from Bobby O! Basically they sounded quite similar.
CL: Divine's biggest hits like Native Love and Shoot Your Shot were also from him. They sounded so good in the club!
NT: In Heaven for example. When Shot Your Shot played, it was the highlight of the evening.
CL: Added with the laserbeams and the artificial fog... The Bobby O sound was something special, it was basically a punk-sound but it was electronic. So straightforward! His productions resembled this itialian joy-factor, as in the Itali-disco or Italo-pop. This record was the beginning of our Bobby-O-love, and at the end of 1983 this love brought us to New York, where we recorded the first version of our hit West End Girls with Bobby O. And if that didn't happen, we wouldn't be sitting here right now talking about it.
NT: Genau (exactly)
CL: Say, without this record, we probably wouldn't have made anything, and we probably turned out to be nothing. I still strongly remember the club where I heard this record.

As the Pet Shop Boys, Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe sold more than 100 million records.

PSBForTheMasses
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Re: Interview about favourite song

#5 Post by PSBForTheMasses »

leesmapman wrote:
Sun 16 Aug 2020, 12:17 pm
Loosely translated:

NT: "The most important song of our lives? That must be Passion from The Flirts". You heard it first, Chris. So you have to tell about it. We're of course talking about the 12" version.
CL: Ah, that was a long time ago.
NT: It must have been 1982
CL: Are we that old?
NT: Chris is one of those people who walks up to a DJ to ask what record is playing. He still does that. I remember you came back from the DJ with a note, and on that note it said: Passion from The Flirts.
CL: That was the time that almost all songs you heard in London came from the same producer: Bobby Orlando, alias Bobby O from New York. In the shops of Carnaby Street, at Leicester Square, everywhere were the songs of Bobby O. And one of these songs was Passion. I still know where and how I bought the 12" vinyl. It cost 5 pounds, which...
NT: ... was scandalously expensive!
CL: I actually didn't have any penny. But what a brilliant production! Those crystal clear sounds, pure electronic, and then those vocals that start after 4 and a half minutes! That 12" version lasted forever!
NT (singing): "I'm waiting for you baby, it's time to show and tell"
CL: From that moment, we were obsessed with Bobby O.
NL: At that time I worked at Smash Hits. At the editorial staff, we had a box with records which we called the "dumper". Back then, music journalists got an incredible amount of free records and most of these records ended up in the dumper rightaway. It occured to me that most of these were dance-records - read: music that has no value for the rock-critics at the staff. I used to say longer at the office, when everyone was gone from the office, to go through all these records. They all were from Bobby O! Basically they sounded quite similar.
CL: Divine's biggest hits like Native Love and Shoot Your Shot were also from him. They sounded so good in the club!
NT: In Heaven for example. When Shot Your Shot played, it was the highlight of the evening.
CL: Added with the laserbeams and the artificial fog... The Bobby O sound was something special, it was basically a punk-sound but it was electronic. So straightforward! His productions resembled this itialian joy-factor, as in the Itali-disco or Italo-pop. This record was the beginning of our Bobby-O-love, and at the end of 1983 this love brought us to New York, where we recorded the first version of our hit West End Girls with Bobby O. And if that didn't happen, we wouldn't be sitting here right now talking about it.
NT: Genau (exactly)
CL: Say, without this record, we probably wouldn't have made anything, and we probably turned out to be nothing. I still strongly remember the club where I heard this record.

As the Pet Shop Boys, Neil Tennant and Chris Lowe sold more than 100 million records.
Thank you :)

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jasonjohn
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Re: Interview about favourite song

#6 Post by jasonjohn »

Thankyou leesmapman :clap: Good read :)

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