Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

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Bulldog

Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#16 Post by Bulldog »

It's puzzling how in spite of their commercial decline they still have a lot of media exposure and keep performing on lots of public events too. Following performances like the Olympics/Paralympics one you would have expected either some backlash for "commercial desperation" or some serious sales boost... Instead nothing seems to happen, it looks more and more like everyone knows and likes PSB but can't be bothered actually buying their records, a bit like what happened to R.E.M. in their later years before disbanding. Or is it all about making sure Discography and the back catalogue keep selling?

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Undertaker
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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#17 Post by Undertaker »

bobo wrote:It's puzzling how in spite of their commercial decline they still have a lot of media exposure and keep performing on lots of public events too. Following performances like the Olympics/Paralympics one you would have expected either some backlash for "commercial desperation" or some serious sales boost... Instead nothing seems to happen, it looks more and more like everyone knows and likes PSB but can't be bothered actually buying their records, a bit like what happened to R.E.M. in their later years before disbanding. Or is it all about making sure Discography and the back catalogue keep selling?
The Olympics boosted the greatest hits. That's all most are interested in really. The lack of promotion is a bit puzzling though. Maybe they are going to promote it in the 2nd week. A bit like how Love etc cd appeared more available in it's 2nd week, trying to spread the sales rather than have them top loaded in week one. The previous two studio albums had tons of promotion. It is a bit strange.

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Radiophonic
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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#18 Post by Radiophonic »

Palpatine wrote: It really doesn't matter what they release. They're an entire generation removed from today's popstars:

Katy Perry (b. 1984) - When West End girls was first released.

Marina Diamandis, Drake, Lady Gaga, Ellie Goulding (b. 1986) - When West End girls went to #1.

Adele (b. 1988) - Adele was born two weeks after they had their last UK #1 single.

Another fun fact - When West End girls went to #1 in the US, it replaced Addicted to Love by Robert Palmer and was replaced on the top spot by Whitney Houston's The Greatest Love of All. Robert Palmer and Whitney Houston are both dead.

Because of downloads, it's a lot harder for established (i.e. old) acts to get a hit than it was ten or twenty years ago. The Bee Gees had their last UK Top 10 single in 1997, thirty years after their first. Because downloads make up 99.7% of sales, it would be impossible for them to achieve the same feat now, no matter how *AMAZING* their single is.

Rather than bemoaning the fact that they no longer have hit singles anymore, you should celebrate the fact that they had such a long run. If, upon West End girls hitting #1 in January 1986, someone had told you that PSB would still be releasing mostly high quality material 26 years later, with the longest gap between singles two years, they'd have laughed in your face. FFS, when I read that Was it worth it? only got to #24, I thought they were finished, and that was over twenty years ago!
This is what I've been saying, but you said it best. Your Robert Palmer/Whitney Houston 'fun fact' chilled me to the bone.
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Patrick Bateman
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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#19 Post by Patrick Bateman »

The singles chart on the day of the Hillsborough disaster.

http://chartarchive.org/c/singles/1989-04-15

It takes so long for the truth to come out in this banana republic that Wendy James was in the top ten.

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Danger
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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#20 Post by Danger »

MD wrote: As a result they have decided to save the promotion budget for the more commercial " dance " album that the Boys are said to be recording this month.
Where did you read this?
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Fredddyyy
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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#21 Post by Fredddyyy »

Undertaker wrote:The lack of promotion is a bit puzzling though.
Funnily enough, the same thing happened with Madonna's latest album: a strange absence of TV appearances...
Maybe it's a plan they're all making up?
:wink:

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morgan1098
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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#22 Post by morgan1098 »

Fredddyyy wrote:
Undertaker wrote:The lack of promotion is a bit puzzling though.
Funnily enough, the same thing happened with Madonna's latest album: a strange absence of TV appearances...
:wink:
The record industry is for all intents and purposes dead. There's no real promotional budget for albums anymore, even if you're Madonna or PSB.

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Radiophonic
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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#23 Post by Radiophonic »

Promotion is changing. It's not about guest slots Alan Titchmarch but more about 'trending' and teasers on Digital Spy. Top Of The Pops died in 2006.
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MD
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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#24 Post by MD »

Danger wrote:
MD wrote: As a result they have decided to save the promotion budget for the more commercial " dance " album that the Boys are said to be recording this month.
Where did you read this?
The part about the dance album being recorded this month was I think from an interview by N&C but I don't know where I read it. Does anyone else recall where this interview was?

The bit about the promotion budget was just me speculating about why the promotion campaign for Elysium is more low profile than the last few albums.
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alanhall
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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#25 Post by alanhall »

I must admit, there are plenty of times when I am listening to songs on the albums and think of how good they are and question why they don't receive airplay however in the back of my mind I know why. It's really a wish because I want them to be acknowledged and profit as they rightfully deserve to.
Using my country as an example - Australia, simply mention that you are listening to the Pet Shop Boys receives chuckles and banter from the wider community...they are stereotyped as producing music for the gay community. People only know them for the songs such as West End Girls, What Have I done to deserve this, Go West and have no idea about any of their other music, and arguably are not interested in knowing. EMI have noted that Pet Shop Boys have a "strong and loyal fanbase between the ages of 35-44" (Open EMI Developer Pack, 2012). I am 34 so sit on the fringe, but interestingly their facebook fans are typically between 25-44 years of age. With this age demographic however, popular radio stations are unlikely to play the music even if it were fantastic, because the age range is arguably not their mainstream audience. Even if the music were given airtime within Australia...it is unlikely to be supported by the larger listening audience as they already have their preconceived ideas.
As a massive fan of the boys, it does sadden me because I selfishly want people to experience their work beyond their mainstream hits. However, like most artists - there is a certain time within the 'public eye', and very much now I would argue that the boys are making music that is intended for their "loyal fan base" because they love making music, and they know that we will appreciate it. I feel very privileged to have been able to listen to the boys for such a sustained period of time. They continue to be my favourite music group, and I hope that whilst they still have this "strong and loyal fanbase" that the music plays forever.

**I acknowledge that their are larger fan bases outside of Australia, and therefore the experience may be different.

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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#26 Post by Cdrodkey »

Isn't it true that Neil and Chris have always had to battle ageism in some way, even during the "imperial" phase?

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Drico One
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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#27 Post by Drico One »

They were always old in the pop sense - especially Neil. He was 31 on breakthrough. Had they arrived six or seven years earlier, they'd be treated like George Michael is now (without the drug-addled, car-crashing, toilet-bothering excesses, obviously) and would have had probably 15 years as first rank pop stars.

In reality, they had eight years of stardom (1985-1993) which was the period prior to Neil turning 40 (in 1994). That's not a coincidence.

They're in it now primarily for the love of their art. We couldn't be luckier. We won the lottery when we made them our composers of choice.

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Deschanel
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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#28 Post by Deschanel »

Radiophonic wrote:
Fredddyyy wrote:The difference is that we didn't get a killer single like Fundamental and Yes had got (I'm With Stupid and Love etc., respectively).
That is why Elysium won't sold as much as their 2 previous studio albums.
I don't think I'm with stupid or Love etc were killer singles. I think it's just a case of them being thought of as an old pop group and past it - the same can be said of all their contemporaries. Madonna's fall - record selling wise - has been spectacular.

Agree with all of this. I don't recall Fundamental or Yes having killer singles (though Fugitive would've made a great "killer" single, haw!) or being great successes to the population at large. Modest hits maybe, over there?

Promotion can only go so far. PSB did the Olympics and Paralympics. Madonna did the SuperBowl, and her "MDNA" was a tremendous bomb, the worst one-week dropoff in Billboard's history. It was also terrible, and its sales were augmented iirc by giving CDs to ticket-buyers to hers shows. Which were v successful, but man, no one except her hard fan base bought that record in the US. She spent all of two or there weeks recording her bits for it, didn't give a f***, it showed, it's not good. And that's what you get. Which is funny considering she's written lots of songs about how you get back what you put in, karma, blah blah. She didn't give a shit about this record, no one else did either. A true bomb.

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Re: Fundamental vs. Yes and Elysium

#29 Post by Eldritch »

I thought Love etc. was a killer single and it was a proper hit in Germany plus in some other countries. Minimal was not a hit, but to me it sounds like a classic PSB single.
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